John W. Spink, PhD

Dr. John Spink is Director of the Food Fraud Prevention Think Tank, as well as Lead Instructor of the Food Fraud Prevention Academy, which provides free online training. He is also an Assistant Professor in the Department of Supply Chain Management (SCM) in the Eli Broad College of Business at Michigan State University (MSU). His food fraud prevention research focus is on policy and strategy to understand and prevent these supply chain disruptions and to implement procurement best practices. He is widely published in leading academic journals and has helped lead national and global regulatory and standards activity.More recently, his teaching and research have expanded from only food fraud prevention to now include integrated supply chain management and, more broadly, supply chain product fraud and counterfeiting.Dr. Spink is the author of the first textbook on the topic with the 2019 publication “Food Fraud Prevention – Development, Management, and Implementation."

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Food Fraud-Related Certification for Packages and Packaging Companies

Are you a packaging supplier to the food industry? How confident are you that you fully meet the food safety management system certification requirements? Beyond that, are you compliant with the food fraud prevention requirements? Read this content for clarification and support. Packaging companies often supply many industries, …

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ANNOUNCEMENT – New Professional Education for Food Industry Suppliers: Packaging, Transportation and Services – October 24-25, 2023

If you sell products or services into the food industry then – at least to some degree – you have a food fraud compliance requirement. This new seminar provides a simple and direct focus on the compliance requirements for suppliers to the food industry. Key focus categories include: …

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FLASHBACK: Publication – The Economics of a Food Fraud Incident, with Case Studies

From time to time we share here a flashback to previous posts that remain relevant today.  This week we revisit a journal article that focused on the economics of a food fraud incident from the perspective of the victim and the fraudster. While macro-level factors are important (e.g., …

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Excerpt – The GFSI Food Fraud 10-Year Review: Creation of VACCP

(FREE download until September 14) This is another excerpt from my new article. This post provides background on the creation of the food fraud prevention compliance requirement. Specifically, this reviews the wide range of standards that define the Vulnerability Assessment and Critical Control Point plan (VACCP) concept. Link …

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NEW PUBLICATION – The GFSI Food Fraud Prevention Compliance Development & Requirements: A Ten-Year Review

(FREE download until September 14) Back in 2012, GFSI took the first step to review food fraud by creating the GFSI Food Fraud Think Tank. Addressing food fraud became a compliance requirement in 2018. This article reviews the development, compliance, and future of food fraud prevention. Link to …

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Excerpt – Data Analytics: Begin with the ‘Known Knowns’ from Incident Databases and Historical Data

A big question for data analytics is where and how to begin the process. It is most logical to start with a database of incidents that have occurred that are ‘known knowns’ (you know what they are and that they are in your supply chain now). This provides …

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Excerpt – Data Analytics: The Value of Predictive Models and Enhanced Traceability

Artificial intelligence and machine learning seem to be the new data analytics or big data hype. There’s an assumption that there is ‘enough’ of the ‘right’ data available to make decisions. There is a difference between a ‘model for insight’ and a ‘model for prediction.’ Food fraud is …

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